psoriasis

DO YOU HAVE PSORIASIS? UNCOVER THE LIFE CHANGING TREATMENT FOR PSORIASIS.

psoriasis

THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PSORIASIS ARE:

PLAQUE PSORIASIS

This is the most common type of psoriasis. Well-defined, coin-shaped patches of skin that are usually red and covered in white, waxy scales,  appear on the elbows and knees. They can be itchy.1, 2

PUSTULAR PSORIASIS

In this rare form of psoriasis, patches of skin are so inflamed that blisters develop all over the body. It can also make you feel unwell with a temperature.2

FLEXURAL PSORIASIS

Flexural psoriasis is found in ‘skin folds’ such as the armpits, buttocks or under the breasts.1, 4

SCALP PSORIASIS

Scalp psoriasis is common in psoriatic patients. About 80% of all psoriasis patients suffer from scalp psoriasis. It is similar to plaque psoriasis, with red and scaly skin patches. The scales look similar to dandruff and can be embarrassing.3

GUTTATE PSORIASIS

Guttate psoriasis usually develops after a severe throat infection. The ‘drop-like’ patches are mostly found on the stomach, back, legs and arms. It generally occurs in children or young adults.2,4

NAIL PSORIASIS

In 50 % of patients with psoriasis, the fingernails are affected. The nail becomes discoloured and ‘pitted’ and may separate from the nail bed.2

toptotoe

If you are affected by patches of raised skin, with thick silvery scales, you may have psoriasis.

PSORIASIS: PATIENT INFORMATION

WHAT IS PSORIASIS?

Psoriasis is a common skin disease.

It affects around 2% of the population and can appear at any age, although it tends to start between the ages of 16 – 22, and 57 – 60 years of age.

Sometimes it can be inherited from parents. In psoriasis, skin cells grow too quickly, which results in red, scaly and sometimes itchy patches.1 This booklet aims to explain psoriasis to you and your relatives. It also aims to help you cope with your disease.

WHAT DOES PSORIASIS LOOK LIKE?

There are several different types of psoriasis. It usually appears on the upper body, elbows or knees, but can also occur on the scalp, hands, feet or nails.

WHAT CAUSES PSORIASIS?

Unfortunately no-one knows exactly what causes psoriasis. An outbreak may be started by:1

  • A serious throat infection
  • Certain medicines
  • Heavy drinking
  • Stress
  • Damage to skin
  • Tobacco smoking
  • Obesity
CAN PSORIASIS BE CURED?

Unfortunately psoriasis is a condition that has no cure and outbreaks can happen throughout your life. 1, 5

However, there are a range of treatments that can relieve the symptoms of psoriasis.

The choice of treatment depends on you and the type of psoriasis that you have.

TREATMENT OPTIONS 1,4

Psoriasis is treated by using a stepwise approach, and only if one step was proven to be ineffective, would the next step be implemented.

STEP 1: Topical agents

  • Steroids: very effective, but may, in high doses over long-term, thin the skin.
  • Coal-tar: effective mostly in combination therapy, but cosmetically less preferred.
  • Dithranol: effective in short-term treatment, not recommended for longterm use.
  • Tazarotene: less effective than steroids, and it may cause skin irritation to healthy skin.
  • Vitamin D3 analogs: generally well tolerated, and preferred for long-term use.
  • Tacrolimus: less effective than steroids but with less adverse skin effects, but due to low penetration is not effective for plaque psoriasis. Preferred for facial psoriasis.

STEP 2: Photo-therapy

STEP 3: Systemic medications

LIVING WITH PSORIASIS

Don’t let psoriasis affect your confidence. There are several things you can do to avoid outbreaks:

  • Avoid getting stressed!
  • Avoid excessive drinking or smoking!
  • Avoid getting your skin damaged!1

With the right medication you can remain confident for long periods of time.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if the treatment from Adcock Ingram is suitable for your type of psoriasis.

For further information:
Speak to your doctor or pharmacist
OR
Visit our website
www.adcock.com
For other useful websites visit:
www.psorinfo.com
www.psoriasis-help.org.uk
In South Africa the South African Psoriasis Association
can be contacted on: +27 (21) 404 5250
or www.psoriasis.org.za

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1. Raboobee N, Aboobaker J, Jordaan HF, Sinclair W, Smith JM, Todd G, et al. Guideline on the management of psoriasis in South Africa. S Afr Med J 2010;100:255-82. 2. Menter A, Gottlieb A, Feldman SR, Van Voorhees AS, Leonardi CL, Gordon KB, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics. J Am Acad Dermatol 2008;58:826- 50. 3. Buckley C, Hoffmann V, Shapiro J, Saari S, Cambazard F, Milsgaard M. Calcipotriol plus Betamethasone Dipropionate Scalp Formulation Is Effective and Well Tolerated in the Treatment of Scalp Psoriasis: A Phase II Study. Dermatol 2008;217:107-113. 4. Psoriasis: Psoriasis and Scaling Diseases: Merck Manual Professional [Online 2012 October] [cited 2014 September 22]; Available from URL: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/skin-disorders/psoriasis-and-scaling-disorders/introduction-to-psoriasis-and-scaling-diseases5. Kragballe K, Austad J, Barnes L, Bibby A, de la Brassinne M, Cambazard F, et al. Efficacy Results of a 52-Week, Randomised, Double-Blind, Safety Study of a Calcipotriol/Betamethasone Dipropionate Two-Compound Product (*) in the Treatment of Psoriasis Vulgaris. Dermatol 2006;213:319-26.

*Trade names removed

1005838 09/2016

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