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Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis® (Strain DSM 17938)

Colic

Reuterina™ Drops and Reuterina™ Vit D are flavourless and can be administered directly to baby, in a bottle, on a teaspoon or on the breast.

  • Colic is defined as episodes of inconsolable crying, fussing and irritability for more than 3 hours per day, for 3 days per week for 1 week. 4reuterina_new
  • While colic is self-limiting after the age of 3 months, it can be very distressing both to parents and the baby. 4
  • The cause of colic is widely debated, but clinical trials agree that colicky babies have lower counts of lactobacilli than non-colicky ones.4
  • Up to 40 % of all babies are diagnosed with infantile colic.3
  • Reuterina™ Drops administered once daily are clinically proven to reduce the crying time in colicky infants within 7 days.3
  • Reuterina™ Drops has shown to reduce crying time by up to 50%.3,4

COLIC AND PROBIOTICS

Can the use of probiotics help soothe colic?

Infant colic is a condition that affects up to 40 % of all babies in the first 3 –  5 months 1 of life and is defined as an otherwise healthy baby that has unexplained episodes of fussing and crying for at least 3 hours per day for 3 days per week 2.

Otherwise healthy would refer to a baby that is gaining sufficient weight, feeding correctly and has no other signs of fever, pain or discomfort 2.

These episodes of crying and fussing are usually predicable and happen at the same or similar times every day, starting at round 2 weeks after birth. While colic is generally self-limiting, meaning that it will spontaneously end after 3 – 5 months of life, it can be very distressing for both the parents and the baby 3. This is often referred to in many households as “witching hour” – the time that parents dread the most every day.

Baby is often inconsolable during these episodes, but will settle immediately after and will show no further signs of discomfort once the episode has passed.

There is also early clinical evidence to show that infant colic may lead to gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation and IBS later in life 3.

The cause of colic remains uncertain. There are probably multiple contributing factors.

In recent years the role of GUT flora has come into focus and clinical trials agree that colicky infants tend to have lower counts of lactobacilii bacteria in their GUT than non-colicky ones 3.

There are a variety of factors that contribute to the GUT flora make-up of a baby, such as method of birth, method of feeding, environmental microbiota and the make-up of the mother’s microbiota….even the geographical area of birth can contribute to a unique GUT flora.

There is no widely accepted treatment for colic and many alternative therapies are used to assist in calming colic, such as warm baths, chiropractic treatment, tummy massage and a restrictive diet for breast-feeding mothers.

Recently trials have shown that probiotics containing lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 and certain preparations containing Fennel oil may be effective in the treatment of colic 4.

Lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 has been shown to reduce the crying time in colicky infants by up to 50 % within 7 days of first administration 3.

There is further evidence to show that treatment within the first 7 days after birth may reduce the possibility of developing colic, constipation and regurgitation, but this field requires further studies and trials 3.

Tips to parents with colicky babies

  • Consult a healthcare professional to confirm a diagnosis of colic if your baby is experiencing any of these symptoms
  • Remember, this will pass, even if it doesn’t feel like it right now
  • Crying time is often increased when a baby senses distress in his/her parents, so try and take turns in calming and soothing baby during episodes of colic
  • Accept help – even if it is just a warm cup of tea and a hug
  • Consult your healthcare professional if you are feeling overwhelmed or distressed

HAPPY BABY, HAPPY MOMMY.

DIARRHOEA

  • Most children will suffer from at least 1 episode of diarrhoea before their second birthday.
  • There are varied causes for episodes of diarrhoea, most of which are self-limiting. The main risk to children and infants during an episode of diarrhoea is dehydration and the primary treatment is a rehydration solution. However, the primary treatment does not reduce the duration and frequency of the episode of diarrhoea.5
  • Reuterina™ Drops and Reuterina™ Junior® are clinically proven to reduce the duration and frequency of diarrhoea.6
  • Reuterina™ also helpsreduce risk of developing antibiotic associated diarrhoea.7
  • S0 Reuterina™ Drops 5 ml: Each 0,2 ml (5 drops) contains a minimum of 100 million cfu of
    Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis® (Strain DSM 17938) until expiry date.
  • S0 Reuterina™ Junior® 30’s: Each chew tablet contains a minimum of 100 million cfu of live
    freeze-dried Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis® (Strain DSM 17938) until expiry date.
  • S0 Reuterina™ Vit D 10 ml: Each 0,2 ml (5 drops) contains a minimum of 100 million cfu of
    Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis® (Strain DSM 17938) until expiry date and Vitamin D3 10 μg.

Reuterina™ Junior® tablets are strawberry flavoured and chewable, making them easy for toddlers to take and tasty too.

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Daily use of Reuterina™ may help reduce sick days

colic and diarrhoea

Marketed by Ascendis Pharma Pty(Ltd)

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References – Further Reading:

1. ImpactRx Data: Data on file. 2. Centrix Data: Data on file. 3. Chau K, Lau E, et al. Probiotics for infantile colic: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938. J Pediatr. 2015 Jan; 166(1): 74-8. 4. Indrio F, Di Mauro A, et al. Prophylactic use of a probiotic in the prevention of colic, regurgitation, and functional constipation: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Mar; 168(3): 228-33. 5. Allen SJ, Martinez EG, et al. Probiotics for treating acute infectious diarrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Nov 10; (11): CD003048. 6. Gutierrez-Castrellon, Lopez-Velazquez G, et al. Diarrhea in preschool children and Lactobacillus reuteri: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2014 Apr; 133(4): e904-9. 7. Kale-Pradhan, Jassal HK, Wilhelm SM. Role of Lactobacillus in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a meta-analysis. Pharmacotherapy. 2010 Feb; 30(2): 119-26.

References – Further Reading: Colic and Probiotics

  1. Chau K, et al. Probiotics for infant colic: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938. J Pediatr. 2015 Jan: 166(1): 74 – 8
  2. Rome III Criteria: updated May 2016
  3. Indrio et al. Prophylactic use of a probiotic in the prevention of colic, regurgitation, and functional constipation: a randomised clinical trial. JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Mar; 168(3): 228 – 33
  4. Harbe et al. Infant Colic – what works: A systematic review of breastfed infants. JPGN ahead of publication
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